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  • What is PIP Coverage in Maryland?

    PIP coverage, or insurance, is short for personal injury protection. It is a benefit that is offered through your automobile insurance carrier and is bundled into automobile insurance policies. It is standard unless you have officially waived this coverage. What is PIP Coverage? PIP will pay for your medical expenses and lost earnings up to a […]

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  • Maryland Auto Insurance You Should be Carrying

    Many drivers only carry the basic necessities for automobile insurance coverage, which includes liability, personal injury protection (PIP), and sometimes uninsured motorist (UM) and underinsured motorist (UIM). There are several other types of first-party auto insurance coverages that could help you out in the event of an incident. Comprehensive and Collision Coverage If you own a newer […]

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  • What is Uninsured Motorist Coverage and How Does it Work?

    In the state of Maryland, the minimum amount of liability coverage that is required by state law is: $30,000 for bodily injury per person, $60,000 bodily injury per accident; and $15,000 in property damage coverage. While liability coverage is mandatory, there are people who unfortunately still refuse to get the required insurance, or in some […]

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  • Do You Need a Criminal Defense or Personal Injury Attorney?

    If you have never been sued or arrested before, it can be easy to confuse proceedings and understand how each type of case is finalized. In some situations, you may have cases pending in both criminal and civil court, making it even more confusing. Criminal Court Cases If you are being “sued” in a criminal […]

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  • Domestic Violence Awareness Month and Resources for Potential Victims

    Recent news reports in Washington, D.C. confirmed that a 31-year-old woman, Paula Renee Coles, was fatally stabbed in her apartment during a domestic dispute. Police responded to an assault in progress, but she was already dead from multiple stab wounds when they arrived. Her attacker fled and is now on the run. With October being Domestic […]

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  • What is Maryland’s Fetal Homicide Law?

    It may come as a surprise to learn that Maryland has a law on the books regarding fetal homicide, meaning that an unborn child can be a murder victim. While the law has been on the books since 2005, the topic is now one of discussion after a recent segment on ABC2 Baltimore’s nightly news. Md. […]

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  • Maryland’s Move Over Law

    Enacted in 2010, and revised in 2014, Maryland’s Move Over Law is one you may not be familiar with, but you need to be. What is the Maryland Move Over Law? The law was aimed at making the roads safer for emergency personnel, like police officers and firefighters, who are working on the road. The law requires […]

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  • Amendments to the Personal Information Protection Act

    Maryland has enacted revisions to the Personal Information Protection Act, otherwise known as House Bill 974, that will become effective January 1, 2018. With identify theft on the rise, these revisions are important additions to the law. Under the modified act, the amendments expand the definition of personal information, modify the definition of breach of security, […]

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  • The Use of Pesticides and Their Long-Term Effects

    On August 3, 2017, a Maryland County circuit court overturned a county-wide ban on lawn and garden pesticides utilized on private property. The lifting of the ban thrills the professional landscaping community as they argue that the pesticides used are approved and licensed by the state. Montgomery County enacted the ban in 2015, which was scheduled to become […]

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  • Ex-School Aide in Maryland Faces Over 100 Counts of Child Sex Abuse

    Local Maryland news outlets reported that a former teachers’ aide and track coach in Charles County faces 119 felony counts of child sex abuse in an indictment handed down on July 30, 2017. 30-year-old Carlos Deangelo Bell is confirmed to be HIV positive and abused at least 24 students at local school(s), his home, and maybe other […]

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  • Assisted Suicide Law in Washington DC Effective as of July 2017

    Effective July of 2017, doctors in Washington DC can now legally prescribe life-ending drugs to certain terminally ill patients. DC now joins states like California, Colorado, Montana, Oregon, Vermont, and Washington that allow some form of legally-assisted suicide. Eligible Patients Only patients who are 18 and over, mentally competent, and with verification of less than six months […]

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  • Bad Papaya Crop Said to Be Source of Recent Salmonella Outbreak

    Per a recall notice issued last week, the FDA is warning consumers to avoid eating Caribeña brand Maradol papayas from Mexico, as they have been linked to an outbreak of Salmonella. The CDC is reporting 47 cases so far, with 12 hospitalizations and one death from 12 states, including Maryland. Maradol papayas are green before they ripen and turn yellow, […]

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  • How Gender and Race Determine Future Income in Personal Injury Damages

    In Maryland, when a person has suffered injuries as a result of another’s negligence, a system has been set up to compensate the victim for his or her losses resulting from those injuries. In Maryland, if the person has damages that are easy to track because they are for tangible expenditures and expenses, like hospital […]

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  • CDC Suggests an Increase in Lyme Disease, Misdiagnosis to Blame

    In the last two years, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has hypothesized that the spring and summer of 2017 will be the worst season for ticks, and by extension, Lyme disease that has been seen in recent years. As reported in 2015, Lyme disease has been diagnosed in more than 260 […]

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  • Naloxone Now Sold Without Restrictions at Maryland Pharmacies

    In March of 2017, Governor Larry Hogan signed an executive order declaring that the State of Maryland was in a state of emergency due to heroin and opioid-related deaths. Since 2015, there have been an estimated 3,000 or more deaths associated with opioid abuse. This has been a significant increase since 2010, when there were annually only […]

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  • Maryland is Second State to Ban Antibiotic Use in Livestock

    Since the discovery of antibiotics, our society has been prescribing these life-savers to kill and limit the growth of bacteria in our systems. Antibiotics are one of the most prescribed drugs used in human medicine, but due to over-prescription of these drugs, roughly 50% of the time these drugs are not prescribed and/or are used […]

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  • New Online Tool Leads to Better Quality of Life for Cancer Patients

    Cancer can lead people down a long and difficult treatment path, leading to a reduced quality of life by its victims and creating a traumatic and stressful life for their loved ones. Sometimes quality of life can be improved when cancer patients are not only receiving effective and attentive care by their oncologists and medical […]

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  • Radiation Exposure of Children in Schools with Wireless Internet

    In the last decade, we have seen a significant increase in and reliance on the use of electronic devices in our daily life. When we leave the house every day, we look to see that we have our phones, our e-readers and tablets, our laptop computers, and ensure that wherever we go, we know what […]

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  • Maryland Seeks to Pass “End-of-Life Option” for Terminal Patients

    In the United States, the public is fraught when it comes to deciding whether doctor-assisted suicide, also known as euthanasia and “death with dignity” laws, should be legal in all 50 states. As for right now, only five states, California, Colorado, Oregon, Vermont, and Washington, and the District of Columbia permit physician-assisted suicide resulting from […]

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  • Family Awarded $10 Million by Jury Against University of Maryland Medical System for Unintended Side Effects of Drug

    In the United States, medical professionals and health care providers look to medications and drugs to alleviate symptoms of injured, sick, and dying patients. When a patient is sick, it may be in part because his or her body, a well-oiled machine, is no longer running in the way that it should. Our bodies are […]

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  • Warning: Flesh-Eating Bacteria on the Rise in Chesapeake Bay

    The start of summer in Maryland holds many promises for residents and tourists, alike. Maryland summer can involve beaches, crab-fests, and a cold, icy platter of fresh oysters and clams. Even though these images are picturesque, there are certain issues that all Marylanders and tourists should be wary of when choosing a beach for sunbathing […]

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  • Apologies from Health Care Providers Not Admissible as Evidence in Malpractice Claims

    When someone has injured you or a member of your family, the first thing that helps to heal the anger, trauma, and frustration of the resulting consequences of the injury is an apology. An apology symbolizes to many in our culture an acknowledgment that wrongdoing has occurred, and an understanding that there are consequences to […]

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  • Workers’ Compensation in Review and an Employer’s Reporting Requirement

    When it comes to workers’ compensation, it is the shared responsibility of the injured employee and the employer to ensure that not only is the employee able to file for workers’ compensation, but that the employer takes step to ensure that the accident site is evaluated and updated to limit the possibility of another injury […]

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  • Child Abuse in Maryland and Mandated Reporting

    In Maryland, hospitals and primary care providers play a significant role in the lives of families and their young patients. Because of the role of these medical professionals and their ability to spend time with family members in their most vulnerable moments, medical professionals may be the first line of defense against child abuse, domestic […]

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  • The golden rule, duty of care, and negligence

    We have been taught from childhood that if we see someone in need, we should make our best efforts to render assistance where and however possible. This stems from our foundation of the golden rule: Treat others as we would like to be treated. However, in tort law, there is no legal requirement that a […]

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  • Maryland Legislature Reviews No-Fault Fund for Birth-Related Neurological Injury

    Malpractice by a hospital or as a result of mistakes made by medical professionals can have long-term effects on the victim who must suffer the consequences of injury. Malpractice can become more traumatic when it occurs to someone vulnerable such as an infant. An infant victim of medical malpractice could face a life of serious […]

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  • An Alarming Rise in Misdiagnosis of Colorectal Cancer in Young Adults

    Cancer is often assumed to be an older person’s disease; it can be easy to forget that cancer can target younger people, as well. Though the incidence of young people being diagnosed with cancer is less commonplace than cancer in older populations, scientists and researchers are seeing a dramatic rise in the incidence of colorectal cancer […]

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  • Emergency Room Visits Associated with Toy Accidents Increase

    It is Easter time; a time in which families gather together to hunt for Easter eggs and enjoy multi-colored toys. Though this family-fun pastime has been celebrated for years, sometimes these celebrations can put children at risk. According to a study published by the journal Clinical Pediatrics, researchers at the Center for Injury Research and Policy […]

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  • Work-Related Hearing Loss

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) survey, one in four adults living in the United States has hearing damage, even though they may report that they have good or excellent hearing. For many of these participants tested by the CDC, they had started to lose their hearing as early as the age of […]

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  • Misdiagnosis of Asthma and Overuse of Asthma Inhaler Can Lead to Significant Issues

    Anestimated 25.7 million people have been diagnosed with asthma, a common lung disorder involving the inflammation and swelling of the airways. Of the 25.7 million of people in the U.S. diagnosed with having asthma, 7 million are children. Generally with people who have asthma, the inflammation of the airways is usually triggered from inhaled particles, like […]

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  • Doctors Find Women’s Pain Less Believable Than Men’s, Causing Disparity in Treatment

    Though it is 2017, there is still evidence that old and debunked stereotypes have a pervasive impact on many facets of our lives. Sexism is still a mainstream problem, and women are still dealing with the brunt of the old boys club mentality. Though it may be frustrating and degrading for these stereotypes to control […]

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  • Prescription Opioid Abuse Epidemic

    In the United States, prescription opioid overdose deaths have quadrupled since 1999. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has estimated that roughly 183,000 people have died from a prescription opioid overdose between 1999 to 2015. In 2015 alone, there were more than 15,000 deaths. The most common prescription opioids that people overdose from are methadone, oxycodone (such as […]

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  • Maryland Looks to Remove Cap on Compensatory Damages Associated with Pet Attacks

    In the United States, pet owners and their pets often have strong bonds and close relationships. Many go above and beyond what is standard to ensure that a pet is loved, treated well, and that his or her life is maintained through medical intervention. It is the strong relationship between pet and pet owner that […]

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  • The Extent of Misdiagnosis of ADHD in Children

    In the United States, since the 1990s, the number of children who have been diagnosed as having attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has skyrocketed. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has estimated that roughly 6.4 million children have been diagnosed as having ADHD. With diagnosis comes hand-in-hand with ADHD drugs, and increased vigilance in school […]

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  • Hospitals Pressure Patients to Deliver Babies by C-Section

    In the United States, the medical community’s purpose is to ensure the safety of its patients. The Hippocratic oath that is taken by medical professionals holds them to a high standard in the care and treatment that they give their patients. People seek out medical help when they are at their most vulnerable and scared. […]

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  • Should Robots and Artificial Intelligence Share Liability?

    The technological world moves fast. In the last year alone, technological advances have built on themselves and progressed to the point where we are seeing, for example, artificial intelligence and robotics on the rise. More recently we have seen the extent to which artificial intelligence and robotics are becoming more mainstream in self-driving cars operating […]

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  • School Policies on Food Allergies and the New Peanut Skin Patch

    In the United States, more than 50 million people have food allergies and annually it costs the country approximately $18 billion. Nut allergies, mainly peanut allergies, have been at the forefront of children’s health issues for decades, due to the extreme sensitivity that children have to these allergies. It is estimated that between 6 and […]

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  • The Importance of Res Ipsa Loquitor in Personal Injury Cases

    In Tort and personal injury law, many times a plaintiff may not know what has happened and cannot provide substantial evidence. However, the law has created a presumption of negligence theory known as “res ipsa loquitor,” which translates to “the thing (the negligent act) speaks for itself.” This would apply in situations such as when […]

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